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Unsanctioned Splendor

There was a blueprint. An unshakable ideology that clouded our minds when it came to genetalia.

More specifically, the vagina. So much so that as a whole, we were stagnant in the beliefs surrounding how it should look and smell. Any deviation was rejected. And talks of taste, trauma, mutilation, ownership, desire and who could have one were deemed repugnant. Even today, the conversations would be considered taboo by those who police them. And any art would be a mere act of rebellion. 

Caroline Federle does just that in her work, “Unsanctioned Splendor.” Her use of delicate fabrics against sharp tools to create subtle depictions of the vulva is a commentary on the sheer existence and complexity of female anatomy. Unveiled before the pussy grabbing, 45th president made his way into office, Federle’s work acts as a resistance to societal norms of modesty and sexuality.

Federle’s collection is reminiscent of Georgia O’Keeffe’s flower paintings in that it challenges perceptions we commonly hold about women and their intentions. Despite her denial that the paintings were in any way erotic, O’Keeffe’s flower study was pigeonholed as being covertly sexual by male perceptions of female complexity. Thus, Federle forces one to reexamine their own presumptions of what femininity means and how it should look and feel, and demands those to grab a mirror and play along.

Federle’s collection is reminiscent of Georgia O’Keeffe’s flower paintings in that it challenges perceptions we commonly hold about women and their intentions. Despite her denial that the paintings were in any way erotic, O’Keeffe’s flower study was pigeonholed as being covertly sexual by male perceptions of female complexity. Thus, Federle forces one to reexamine their own presumptions of what femininity means and how it should look and feel, and demands those to grab a mirror and play along.

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UNVEILED BEFORE THE PUSSY GRABBING

Federle’s collection is reminiscent of Georgia O’Keeffe’s flower paintings in that it challenges perceptions we commonly hold about women and their intentions. Despite her denial that the paintings were in any way erotic, O’Keeffe’s flower study was pigeonholed as being covertly sexual by male perceptions of female complexity. Thus, Federle forces one to reexamine their own presumptions of what femininity means and how it should look and feel, and demands those to grab a mirror and play along.

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